A Christmas nudge in the strive towards continence

I don’t normally talk about something so personal but I thought it was worth sharing our experience as lot of children struggle with continence. Eliza is seven years old and wears pull-ups both day and night. There have been so many hurdles to jump including fear of small spaces, fear of noisy hand dryers and just being in a place that is always different. Lets face it, at home it is easier as the bathroom pretty much looks the same but when you are out and about every toilet place looks, smells and sounds different. It has taken years and I mean YEARS to bypass all these hurdles and we have gone at her pace with the odd nudge forward if we thought she was ready. It has been a long process of reassurance, explanations and visual aids but she is so close now. During the last few months she has been using the bathroom more and more and trying really hard to be continent.

After a lovely meeting with the continence team this week we decided it was time to take the next step and move from pull-ups (nappies but shaped like pants/knickers) to proper cotton knickers (Eliza has chosen to call them knickers but some of you may say pants, undies, underwear… but as Eliza calls her pull-ups ‘pants’ we needed a different word).  As it is such a change we thought using washable incontinence knickers would be a step forward – these are simply cotton and look like normal girls knickers but with a built in cotton booster to help with little accidents, you know those ‘not quite made it’ moments. The hope is as time progresses she will then just move on to regular girls knickers in time. We have extra books ready  and social stories to help her understand as much as possible. This is when I decided on a plan that may help her take to the idea even more, a nudge in confidence by writing to her from one of her most loved people, Santa!.

Eliza LOVES Christmas, she adores Santa and every December she pretty much bounces through the month rather than walking. So I  wrote her this letter…

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This letter will be ‘delivered’ to her on Tuesday as she breaks up from School for the holidays. As you will see in the letter, we have mentioned Mrs Claus and a special present. To help Eliza with her next step towards continence and use her love of Christmas I am making up a pretty box, a ‘special present’ from Mrs Claus. Inside the box will be some pretty knickers, books, stickers and a new kids padded toilet seat (you know those ones you can move on and off as needed). It will be wrapped up and will have a letter from Mrs Claus attached. The fact that Santa, in his letter above, will have pre warned her about the present will help ready her for the arrival of this special gift. This is the letter from Mrs Claus…

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So that is the plan and I hope it helps her on her transition. I thought the special box should come from Mrs Claus, you know, girl to girl as such but with the added mention of her in Santa’s letter. So there it is, my cheeky use of something my child loves being used to try and help her with something she struggles with. It wont work for all children, this is just something I know will go down well with Eliza. Although I hope it gives some of you ideas that things like this can work. It doesn’t have to be Christmas, it could be linked to a favourite character or film. This is just something I know MY child will adore and be amazed at. Eliza is very visual, she likes to see/watch and to read and she will read the letters over and over with joy. I am hoping it gives her that extra boost in confidence to at least try the knickers and we will just from there, at her pace with love and patience, like we always do.


***Editing on 30th November 2018 to add that the above went as expected and Eliza was thrilled with her special present from Mrs Clause and within 2 weeks was completely continent and has been ever since. She never bothered with the padded pants, she chose the regular knickers. She still mentions her special letter from Mrs Claus around this time of year***


 

A Special Little Girl’s Christmas

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Dear Santa

As another Christmas approaches fast, I always think back to one special meeting we had a few years ago. It was a visit that changed how my daughter (and myself) saw Christmas and helped her enjoy what can be a stressful time of year that is full of change. Back in 2012 we came to see you in your magical winter wonderland with Eliza who was 3 years old. It was extremely busy as every child on earth wants to meet Santa and who can blame them, you rock! We had to queue, something Eliza wasn’t very good at them. The queue was in a very very VERY busy crowd of people, another thing Eliza wasn’t very good with. You see Santa, autistic children struggle with crowds, noise, waiting, busy atmospheres and change but Eliza had only one goal in mind which was to meet you.

“Merry Christmas to you all, you have a special little girl”

We spent what felt like years in a queue trying to entertain her as best we could and eventually reached the front of the queue. One of your kind elves led us to a door which opened and there you were waiting for us. The room was amazing and I was lost in the magic of Christmas as I admired the tree, the decorations, the smells and the lights. Eliza ignored you as you tried to ask her what she wanted for Christmas and whether she thought Mummy had been good that year (For the record Santa I am pretty good most of the time, honest). I nervously stepped forward and said “I’m sorry, she can’t talk yet” and you looked at me, smiled and nodded. Eliza wandered around the room being nosy, looking at her face in shiny baubles and picking up things that caught her eye. I started to move in a bit of a panic but you touched my hand and said “Leave her be, she’s OK. Nothing in here that can hurt her”.  A grumpy elf knocked and suggested time was ticking by but you kindly said we needed a little longer. Eliza carried on looking around and then she finally looked at you and came and sat by you. You quickly took this opportunity to greet her again and she smiled. She started to flap, it’s something she does when she is happy. Spontaneously Eliza leaned in towards your hand to give it a kiss at the same time you clicked a secret button to take her photo with you. I thanked you about a million times (probably at least ten in reality) because you made her visit so relaxed and comfortable. As we left the room you grabbed my hand and said “Merry Christmas to you all, you have a special little girl”.

The words you said to me have always stayed in my head. Every year we approach Christmas and I think of that one visit to see you. You see Santa what you didn’t know was that three weeks before we met you, Eliza had received her diagnosis of Autism with moderate-severe learning difficulties. She could not speak other than 2 or 3 words. The world overwhelmed her and she struggled to find her place in it. You made her feel so at ease and she had a wonderful time seeing you. For me as a parent I am so grateful to how you treated her and for the kind things you said to me. Thank you Santa for taking the time to let her anxiety drop, for letting her explore and just being understanding and kind. 

Eliza’s mum xx

If stripping was in The Olympics….

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Are you watching the Olympics? I love it and often sit here making remarks like “If Eliza were in that contest…..”

If stripping was an Olympic sport, Eliza would win Gold every single time. In under twenty seconds she can undress and sit back on the couch, remote control in hand and Mickey Mouse on TV yet this is the child that simply can not undress herself for bed or PE at school…..

Flapping!!! Another Gold, she seriously looks like she would take off sometimes. Flappy when happy though, beautiful smile she has and when she is laughing she has a dimple that is super cute. I wonder if she could flap through high jump, she definitely has the long legs. We tried Gymnastics before with her, she told me how bored she was after only 2 sessions.

Sprinting, well I think we would all have gold medalists on our hands. Someone opens a bag of crisps and whoosh, she is off like a highly trained sniffer dog! Don’t ever forget how fast they go from ‘dead weight laying on the floor refusing to move’ to someone that would give Usain Bolt a run for his money at the blink of an eye.

Shot Put is another. Wow, how I have seen iPad’s and juice cups fly. Not to mention shoes, DS consoles, remote controls, siblings….

A judo/wrestling combo is something that happens daily in our house between Eliza and Noah. That grabbing of clothes, linking legs and throwing each other on the floor. Usually to decide who gets the TV remote or the last pack of crisps. Oh or a toy that neither of them played with for months yet one of them found and it’s suddenly like treasure!

Weightlifting I think belongs to us parents. Lifting that ‘dead weight’ child from the middle of roads, car parks, parks and bundling them safely in the car. Carrying them up the stairs or removing them from the top of a sibling they are sat on. I should have muscles like Popeye by now.

I love to reflect and I have learnt many things from what I have just written above…

– I watch too much Olympics
– A lot of issues are caused by crisps
– I need to get out more

Enjoy your Tuesday and the Olympics xxx

You can follow us here Living With Blooming Autism

Autism & Anxiety

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Dear Anxiety

It has been a while since you and I fell out. Today you made me angry even though I was not your target. You see my daughter is 6 and she is autistic. It makes her day to day life extremely hard at times as she attempts to navigate a crazy world and find her place in it. It’s not helpful when you come along and add to the mounting stress she feels. I know you often tag along with your friend autism, you seem to be closely connected.

We had a lovely play date arranged with some close friends in a park we often visit. The school holidays throw her out of her comfort zone but she copes really well with planning. It should have been a lovely day. Plan we did, prompt we did, talk it through and off we went. Some days there just isn’t enough planning in the world, you just seem to grab her regardless. My beautiful girl was crying, screaming and kicking the seat in the car. She hit her little brother, she threw stuff she could get hold of. Refusing to get out of the car we sat there, her crying and her brother unsure whilst I decided on the next best step for all concerned. You had her, you were winning.

I wanted to yell and scream at you Anxiety. I really did. I wanted to rip you out of my daughter and stamp on you a million times for what you do to her. I wanted to swear at you and boy did I have some select words just for you. I wanted to cry, truth be told, because I am exhausted, overwhelmed and often feel out of my depth trying to do what is best for her. Trying, as a parent, to make her world as easy and understandable as I can whilst at the same time keeping her safe. I have to think with/about/for her 24/7 and when you decide to stop by it is a hundred times worse because she becomes ‘flighty’. Likely to run at any given chance and with her lack of danger awareness, it is bloody scary.

Instead I wish to thank you, Anxiety. You see every time something like this happens it makes me a stronger parent, ready to face you the next time you decide to gatecrash our lives. You know what else? With my help (and maybe a little stubborn attitude) she got out of the car. She had a few moments on the floor waving and kicking her arms in the air and I let her. Why? Because she was releasing you. She was angry at the feelings she was having. Deep down she wanted to see her friends, to go on the swings, to eat the picnic we took with us. After she started to calm I bent down and gave her a choice – go to the play day or get back in the car and go home. I was calm and fair, she knew either would be OK with me and do you know what, she chose the play day and after a few more minutes calming she had a great time. It was a lovely day after all. You are a pain in the backside Anxiety and believe me when I say I HATE you, I really mean it.

Thank you for attempting to take my daughter down today, you have shown me even at the age of 6 she isn’t going to let you win. She made a choice to put you to one side, remind you that you don’t get to rule her life. She was able to release her feelings safely inside my car and make a decision to keep going. I would say better luck next time but that just suggests I offer you seat on our next day out so instead I will just bid you farewell for today but no doubt you will be back at some point. We will of course be ready for you every time.

Yours Sincerely

Eliza’s Mum