The People You Meet…

lihobko

I’ve been alive for 40 years now so it is safe to say I have met a fair few people over the years. It is interesting how the people we meet change our lives and sadly some not always for the better but we learn from the mistakes, the pain and the negativity and we move on. I come from a large yet scattered and disconnected family although I am lucky to have a few amazing members of the family who have been, and always will be, there no matter what. Some do their best to understand about Eliza and autism. I have a select few close friends that know everything about me and my life. I have quite a few what I call ‘passing friends’ that I may not see often, may not chat to often but they are friends. It’s just that lives are so busy and sometimes so very different that we don’t get the chance to be more than friends that simply pass each other here and there. Then there is this extra family that I have. A family I found over the last few years and it keeps growing. This family is also made up of wonderful people. Some I have never met and some I may never get to meet, a few I plan to meet and a few I have had the delightful privilege of meeting already. I met them all through my blog and through my Facebook page Living With Blooming Autism

When you start to tell people your child is different, it can be a real make or break time between yourself and family & friends. Within months of telling people Eliza is autistic, our friendship circle didn’t just reduce, it pretty much disappeared. I was no longer welcome at coffee morning/play date sessions, Eliza was no longer invited to birthday parties. She was different and to some, she simply didn’t fit in with plans or ideas of how a child should be. Judgemental? Yes. Lack of understanding? Totally. The day a ‘friend’ told me to adopt Eliza to someone else so I could get on with my life was a moment that changed me and still gets to me even today. At 40 years of age I panic at the offer of friendship. That fear of being tossed aside and pretty much abandoned (at a time I really needed people the most) is always there in my head. The pain I felt in my heart that my beautiful daughter was not wanted by others because she didn’t fit their perfect ideas and lifestyles is always there in my head. Luckily I have been honest and open to the lovely friends that I have and they understand why I sometimes take a while to put myself (and Eliza) back out there for things. It’s not easy to regain confidence after something like that which was caused by something you and your daughter have no control over.

A couple of years ago I started our Facebook Page. It was an outlet for me, a way to spread awareness and understanding about autism but also a place to share stories about Eliza and how she progresses. Through that page and then this blog I have met some amazing people. Some are becoming very close friends and quite a few I chat to on a daily basis or regularly. A few have even met myself and Eliza. Some are fellow page owners/bloggers, some are parents/carers, some are teachers, some are autistic adults. Quite a few are a combination of those groups. All different backgrounds, some different Countries and various ages. A bunch of amazing people. They all just ‘get it’ when I rant about stuff or celebrate something that might seem so small to others but these guys know how important it is. We learn from each other because every single life story behind each of us is so different. We share our celebratory moments with each other and sometimes our darkest ones. We pick each other up on the days we feel like giving up, we celebrate the successes of each other no matter how big or how small. We fight sometimes, we bicker (let’s face it life is extremely hard some days and we are all exhausted) but we make up and we move on without grudges. That is why I call them my extra family. I need them. I like having them in my life. I love that they want us in theirs. Some of them I may have not met face to face yet, some I may never meet in person but they are part of my life through meeting online and making our own support network.

I love my family, my friends and I also love my extra family. Because of all the people I have met along the way, these are the ones that matter the most. These are the ones that are making me, me! The ones that accept and love us no matter what and continually offer support and understanding. Those of you that chose to walk away I thank you, because you helped make me the person I am today. Such a shame you won’t get to see the amazing person my daughter is. You chose ignorance over understanding and acceptance. Some of you just didn’t understand but rather than ask you moved on. You are missing out on so much. I will be fine. Eliza will be amazing. Because we have the people that matter.

This piece was written for  ‘Finish the Sentence Friday’ which is hosted this week by Finding Ninee and mardrasikora

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She just keeps blooming

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This time 8 years ago I sat in a hospital bed waiting for Eliza to make her entrance in to the world. She was almost a week overdue and I had been taken in a day earlier to be induced. I sat there wondering what she would be like and imagining the things we would do together. I was also terrified and in that ‘first time mum’ moment. I sat panicking if I would be a good enough mum and worried about all the decisions I would be making in the future around , for and with her. I tried to sleep thinking of all those firsts we would have – first word, first tooth, first school….  but having already been in labour a fair few hours I was exhausted  but unable to rest because of all the monitoring and Eliza had decided being in the ‘back to back’ position was how she wanted to arrive which made the labour a lot harder for her and a heck of a lot more painful for me. Eventually Eliza was born early the next morning. I remember staring at this beautiful little bundle and thinking “It’s OK Princess, whatever happens we got this” and feeling all would be wonderful and amazing.

Less than 18 months later I found myself fighting my first battle, a battle to be heard because everyone was brushing me off and saying I was overreacting when I stated my concerns that Eliza was not progressing well in certain areas. So many people telling me “She’s just a late bloomer”, “She’ll crawl soon enough” and “It’s just a speech delay”. Nobody seemed to listen when I said she had LOST speech, that we had actually had speech and it was like a switch had been flicked and it had been erased. Nobody seemed to care that Eliza didn’t even try to stand let alone attempt to walk and her crawling was done with much struggling. I was made to feel like a rubbish parent, one that overreacts and I was shown the door by the GP and various others. As Eliza approached her second birthday we should have been offered a ‘2yr check’ to discuss how she was progressing, any concerns etc (It’s offered to all children but these days done around 18 months old instead) but lack of Health Visitors at that time meant we simply got a letter saying “If you have any concerns, call us”. So I did. I called and was given the same old speel about allowing her to develop at her pace, each child is different blah blah blah. I knew all this of course but I also knew there was more to what I was seeing in Eliza so I shouted. I shouted at the lady on the end of the phone and told her “You need to LISTEN to what I am saying please!”. So after hearing the desperation in my voice she asked me to tell her my concerns. I told her the speech had started but then gone, that Eliza showed no interest in wanting to walk, that she played alongside kids but never ‘with’ them. That she did not communicate a single need, barely cried and was always frustrated. That Eliza could not hold a spoon or coordinate her hand to mouth at all and struggled with fine motor skills. That we seemed to have the most epic tantrums in the world over the smallest thing (which in later months I learnt about meltdowns and why the smallest thing would trigger them). We were called in for an appointment the same week.

Eliza was diagnosed at 3 years old as Autistic Spectrum Disorder with moderate-severe learning difficulties. It was a day of relief for me. I know that sounds odd to some. To know that I wasn’t the crazy parent I had been made to feel I was because there on this piece of paper was a reason behind my concerns and Eliza’s struggles. All the fighting to be heard had worked. All the waiting for appointments and then attending what felt like hundreds of appointments had got us to this point. The last five years have gone so fast. Teaching Eliza to use PECS (Picture Exchange Communication System) so she could communicate was hard work. She spent half her time throwing the PECS folder at the speech therapists head and the other half trying to eat the pictures! Eventually she realised this little book could achieve great things (well to Eliza it was mainly about getting food and going outside, her main priorities in life). We also learnt Makaton signing which she was really good at (to the point I often had to go google what she had just signed to me because she was so much better at it than I was). Around the age of 4 the spoken words started to return. The next couple of years her speech slowly improved and it soon became clear she could read extremely well but we just hadn’t been aware of it, she’d not been able to tell us till then. Eliza always used small sentences, usually 2-3 words at most to communicate until one day at School she decided to throw her opinion and advice out there. A hula hoop had been thrown a little high and had landed on the roof at school. Out of nowhere Eliza stated “You need a broom and a chair to get the hoop off the roof” (or similar words) and carried on about her business whilst her teachers, speech therapist and later on myself stood open mouthed at this speech that was also spoken in context. Needless to say we changed her speech therapy goals lol

So now, here I sit writing this and wondering where the last 8 years have gone. Our journey may have different twists and turns that I wasn’t expecting but that’s OK. We’ve still had all the firsts I mentioned before but the first word she said, I cherish because after speech regressed it took years to hear her voice again. Eliza never stops trying, she doesn’t give up. She is thriving in School and learning all curriculum, she reads extremely well and she is making friends now she has learnt to develop her social skills and interactions. She fights the anxiety that often tries to take over her life and over the last 8 months has tried so many new things including trick or treating and carol singing. Eliza changes every day in to a beautiful, independent, feisty young girl with an inherited sarcastic sense of humour that she gets from me. The journey has been hard at times but it has also been amazing. She just keeps blooming.

Happy 8th birthday for tomorrow sweetheart. Our journey may be different to others but it’s OK Princess, whatever happens we got this xxxxxxx

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